Ride the Wave


Sitting on the Wave has numerous benefits for your body.


You control the amount and direction of motion which enables access to those back and pelvic floor muscles which are responsible for natural posture.


This motion transfers through your entire body from your pelvis to your head and to your feet stimulating the muscles and joints of your neck and legs.



Sitting on the Wave also stimulates the acupuncture points that are on your seat bones aiding back muscles.

Sitting on the Wave has a helpful effect on your ability to maintain or regain range of movement of the hip and pelvis, and maintain the freedom of your SI joint. It can also maintain the elasticity, resilience and promote regeneration of your fascia.

All of this has a helpful effect on your ability to balance in movement.



The key to maintaining balance lies with three major sensory contributors.

1. Vision provides you with a sense of where you are in relation to your environment and gives you clues that keep you from tripping over obstacles.

2. Nerve receptors in the fluid-filled semicircular canals of the inner ear send balance messages to the brain when your head moves side to side or up and down.

3. The third contributors to good balance are proprioceptors, which are nerves embedded in muscles and tendons that tell the brain when a movement occurs so the body can shift to maintain its equilibrium.


The good news is that balance is a motor skill that can be maintained and even improved with exercises that keep your hips, knees, and ankles strong. When you feel comfortable enough doing these exercises with your eyes open, try them with your eyes closed to stimulate your vestibular system.


Mobility and stability unlock better human movement. Flexibility can benefit movement by increasing the range of motion within a joint. Working to improve movement in as little as 10 minutes a day can lead to healthier joints, less pain, and decreased risk of injury.


Ride your Wave often, and be ready to ride!


CONTACT JOAN

© 2018 The Rider's Edge by Joan Adler.